Friday, December 9, 2011

Strong Children Japan



Portraits of Japanese children and young people living with the ongoing consequences of the Fukushima Daichi nuclear accident, the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of March 11th 2011. The images and words are made by the children, combined with their portrait by Japan-based English artist Geoff Read done according to their instructions. The aim is to enable them to share their important experiences and thoughts with the world.

Strong Children Japan


Painting by Hana, 9, from Japan, with Japan-based English artist, Geoff Read. Part of the exhibition, Strong Children, featuring art and short essays by Japanese children affected by the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear disaster.


Strong Children Japan


see also > whats up: webcasts | FREEZE OUR FUKUSHIMAS | Strong Children Japan

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WHATS UP - RC'S NUCLEAR BLOG


Thursday, December 8, 2011

Zen - Movie about Dogen






Banmei Takahashi's "Zen"

based on the life of Japanese Zen Master Dogen
(19 January 1200 – 22 September 1253).


道元禅師
Dōgen Zenji (also Dōgen Kigen 道元希玄, or Eihei Dōgen 永平道元, or Koso Joyo Daishi) (19 January 1200 – 22 September 1253) was a Japanese Zen Buddhist teacher born in Kyōto, and the founder of the Sōtō school of Zen in Japan after travelling to China and training under the Chinese Caodong lineage there. Dōgen is known for his extensive writing including the Treasury of the Eye of the True Dharma or Shōbōgenzō, a collection of ninety-five fascicles concerning Buddhist practice and enlightenment.



Zen (2009) Part 1




Zen - Movie about Dogen - DharmaflixWiki
....Banmei Takahashi's "Zen" is that rare serious film about this form of Buddhism, which has had a huge cultural influence but is little understood — let alone practiced — by ordinary Japanese. Perhaps it's a sign that, after decades of a single-minded focus on materialism, the culture is returning to its spiritual roots; or that one Baby Boomer director (Takahashi is 60) is getting religious in his old age.


Zen (2009) Part 2




Zen Beginner: Zen Movie Review: Zen
...Despite some moments of CG silliness the movie does manage to provide good dramatic pacing considering the amount to time in the movie that's dedicated to Zazen (admittedly not the most compelling thing to watch), the major events of Dogen's life are all covered, up to his death. The movie portrays him dying in Zazen as the monks continue to sit the rest of the period out of dedication to his practice. This portrayal diverges from the historical account but it's emblematic of the way a Zen master is supposed to die: either standing or sitting in perfect samadhi.

Overall Zen is entertaining and contains enough of a historical outline of Dogen's life that it's a worthwhile movie. I give it four out of five enso's.



see also


whats more: The Ino's Blog: Study Hall - Shobogenzo
正法眼蔵
Shōbōgenzō
(lit. "Treasury of the True Dharma Eye") The term Shōbōgenzō has three main usages in Buddhism: (1) It can refer to the essence of the Buddha's realization and teaching, that is, to the Buddha Dharma itself, as viewed from the perspective of Mahayana Buddhism, (2) it is the title of a koan collection with commentaries by Dahui Zonggao, and (3) it is used in the title of two works by Dogen Kigen...


If you do not realize the fruit at this moment, when will you realize it?

If you do not cut off delusion at this moment, when will you cut off delusion?

If you do not become a buddha at this moment, when will you?

If you do not sit as a buddha at this moment, when will you practice as an active buddha?

Diligently examine this in detail...


whats more: Genjo Koan
Genjo Koan is perhaps the best known section of Eihei Dogen’s masterwork, Shobogenzo (Treasury of the True Dharma Eye).
"The depth of the drop is the height of the moon"


Monday, December 5, 2011

new at what it is: red leaves, autumn wind update



updated presentation of a photo from last year
> what it is: red leaves, autumn wind update


original: what it is: red leaves, autumn wind
red leaves align
with force of wind
all the buddhas shout




see also

whats more: autumn wind (not exactly haiku?)
俳句
Haiku (haikai verse), plural haiku, is a form of Japanese poetry, consisting of 17 moras (or on), in three phrases of 5, 7, and 5 moras respectively. Although haiku are often stated to have 17 syllables, this is inaccurate as syllables and moras are not the same. Haiku typically contain a kigo (seasonal reference), and a kireji (cutting word). In Japanese, haiku are traditionally printed in a single vertical line and tend to take aspects of the natural world as their subject matter, while haiku in English often appear in three lines to parallel the three phrases of Japanese haiku and may deal with any subject matter.

what it is: Fall in Mixed Woodland, Mendocino County


hurdy gurdy




painting by Hippolytus Lipinski: minstrel (1876),
possibly in Krakow (?)


i am seriously wanting to get a gurdy :)

see what next: Hurdy Gurdy: What's a Hurdy Gurdy anyway?

see what next: HURDY GURDY - misc photos

check out some beautiful instruments at what next: HURDY GURDY - photos: instruments by Hurdy Gurdy Crafters


NEW: hurdy gurdy playlist at
robertcherwink's YouTube channel





Sunday, November 20, 2011

reading list: Appreciate Your Life: The Essence of Zen Practice

Appreciate Your Life: The Essence of Zen Practice by Taizan Maezumi Roshi (Shambhala Classics)

Here is the first major collection of the teachings of Taizan Maezumi Roshi (1931-1995), one of the first Japanese Zen masters to bring Zen to the West and founding abbot of the Zen Center of Los Angeles and Zen Mountain Center in Idyllwild, California. These short, inspiring readings illuminate Zen practice in simple, eloquent language. Topics include zazen and Zen koans, how to appreciate your life as the life of the Buddha, and the essential matter of life and death.

Appreciate Your Life conveys Maezumi Roshi’s unique spirit and teaching style, as well as his timeless insights into the practice of Zen. Never satisfied with merely conveying ideas, his teisho, the Zen talks he gave weekly and during retreats, evoked personal questions from his students. Maezumi Roshi insisted that his students address these questions in their own lives. As he often said, “Be intimate with your life.”


Taizan Maezumi Roshi c. 1994; Peter Cunn photo
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons

The readings are not teachings or instructions in the traditional sense. They are transcriptions of the master’s teisho, living presentations of his direct experience of Zen realization. These teisho are crystalline offerings of Zen insight intended to reach beyond the student’s intellect to her or his deepest essence. - Maezumi, Hakuyū Taizan - Sweeping Zen – The Zen Buddhism Database


Taizan Maezumi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: Hakuyū Taizan Maezumi (前角 博雄, February 24, 1931—May 15, 1995) was a Japanese Zen Buddhist teacher and rōshi, and lineage holder in the Sōtō, Rinzai and Harada-Yasutani traditions of Zen. He combined the Rinzai use of koans and the Sōtō emphasis on shikantaza in his teachings, influenced by his years studying under Hakuun Yasutani in the Harada-Yasutani school. He founded or co-founded several institutions and practice centers, including the Zen Center of Los Angeles, White Plum Asanga, Yokoji Zen Mountain Center and the Zen Mountain Monastery.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

WHAT NEXT - new blog


i recently launched a NEW BLOG - a mash up of whats up, what it is, whats more, GlobaLove Think Tank, stuff from my inbox & more - what next RC'S NEWS & RANDOM blog


whats up is now called "nuclear blog" - i started whats up in March of 2011 for miscellaneous news and random postings which don't fall under the photo or art & studies themes of my other two blogs ... includes a number of newsfeeds and a videos page. launched on the day of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

After the first few posts it became basically a news blog about the ongoing Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe with related nuclear news and commentary - not so random anymore, and it became progressively more activist...

what next is now where the miscellaneous news and random postings will land, and whats up will remain dedicated to nuclear news

Friday, October 21, 2011

music - Musicians United for Safe Energy - "KOAN" & "DON'T DIG HERE" | NO NUKES!


whats up: "DON'T DIG HERE" | Musicians United for Safe Energy | Nukes, Earthquakes & Hurricanes


KOAN



The MUSE concert began with solemn acknowledgement of the recent Fukushima disaster. This video connected the nature of a Koan's teaching enlightenment to the need to raise energy consciousness as an introduction to the stage performance by Kitaro.

Video Created by Andrew Thomas

On August 7th 2011, thousands gathered at Shoreline Amphitheater for a day of music, inspiration, education and activism. Between the seven hours of stage performances, the audience saw a collection of videos about the issues, and ways to become engaged in the cause. For everyone who couldn't be there, we're happy to present these videos online.


DON'T DIG HERE



Written by: James Raymond
Performed by: David Crosby, Graham Nash, James Raymond, Russ Kunkel, Leland Sklar, Dean Parks and Jeff Pevar
Produced by: Russ and Nathanial Kunkel


more


whats up: "DON'T DIG HERE" | Musicians United for Safe Energy | Nukes, Earthquakes & Hurricanes
In August 2007, musicians Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and Graham Nash, along with longtime energy activists and colleagues, Harvey Wasserman and Tom Campbell, helped organize NukeFree.org as an on-going grassroots campaign and website working to defeat up to $50 billion in proposed loan guarantees for building new atomic reactors. Had these guarantees gone through, there would be virtually no chance of stopping the construction of dozens of new atomic reactors all over the United States.

fukushima & related nuclear news at whats up blog

whats up news & random blog: Videos

whats up: Links



NO NUKES! - see also



more videos
robertcherwink's Channel - YouTube
NUCLEAR playlist
whats more art & studies blog: videos



graphics by rc


whats more: fukushima art


the attached file is suitable for 4x6 high resolution photo prints - please print some and pass them around - no nukes!

Einstein said, "The splitting of the atom changed everything save man's mode of thinking; thus we drift towards unparalleled catastrophe." He also said, "Nuclear power is a hell of a way to boil water."

visit page - whats more: fukushima art


whats more: abolish atomic



Roseadjoa says waking up isn't easy when living a nightmare ♥

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visit page - whats more: abolish atomic
> go to whats up for nuclear news


whats up: NO NUKES | RE-TOOL NOW - Flyer | Shut San Onofre | Code Killers

PRINT OUT & HAND OUT | POST | EMAIL



visit page | click here for print-quality PDF


other art & photos


click here for a collection of art & photos; index & youtube slideshow

free downloads
donate



whats up news & random blog
- NO NUKES | RE-TOOL NOW!

fukushima & related nuclear news, interviews, analysis & music

Thursday, September 22, 2011

tara (110921)



new art -
"Tara reconstruction"



final

"Tara - she is everywhere"




history


"Tara reconstruction" was created from photo what it is: ripped up (January 18, 2009)
dark!





see also


whats more: tara 8790 (more):
Within Tibetan Buddhism Tara is regarded as a Boddhisattva of compassion and action. She is the female aspect of Avalokitesvara (Chenrezig) and in some origin stories she comes from his tears...


more buddhist art


buddha 100407

tara 8790 (more)

Bhumisparsha Mudrā update

Bhumisparsha Mudrā

Vajrapani 100514

Diamond Sutra

Dharma Wheel & About Dharma

buddha cave


downloads | donate


Links

• whats more: more about Buddhism

• Wikipedia
Tara

Saturday, August 13, 2011

Genjo Koan



enlightenment

"...Enlightenment is like the moon reflected on the water. The moon does not get wet, nor is the water broken. Although its light is wide and great, the moon is reflected even in a puddle an inch wide. The whole moon and the entire sky are reflected in dewdrops on the grass, or even in one drop of water..."
[Aitken & Tanahashi translation] - SIT-A-LONG with JUNDO: Genjo Koan XXVIII


Genjo Koan is perhaps the best known section of Eihei Dogen’s masterwork, Shobogenzo (Treasury of the True Dharma Eye). See whats more: The Ino's Blog: Study Hall - Shobogenzo


all things

first verse of Genjo Koan -

"As all things are buddha-dharma, there is delusion and realization, practice, and birth and death, and there are buddhas and sentient beings.

As the myriad things are without an abiding self, there is no delusion, no realization, no buddha, no sentient being, no birth and death.

The buddha way is, basically, leaping clear of the many and the one; thus there are birth and death, delusion and realization, sentient beings and buddhas.

Yet in attachment blossoms fall, and in aversion weeds spread."


Genjo Koan @genjokoan.com


Genjokoan | Tricycle

"The text we’ve chosen to study this period and the subject of Enkyo Roshi’s weekly online talks at tricycle.com is Genjokoan (Actualizing the Fundamental Point), perhaps the best known section of Eihei Dogen’s masterwork, Shobogenzo (Treasury of the True Dharma Eye). As he does throughout his work, here Dogen focuses on the oneness of practice and enlightenment and on the expression of Buddha-nature through wholehearted practice free from dualistic thinking—including thoughts of attaining enlightenment."

As all things are Buddha-dharma, there are delusion, realization, practice, birth and death, buddhas and sentient beings. As myriad things are without an abiding self, there is no delusion, no realization, no buddha, no sentient being, no birth and death. The Buddha Way, in essence, is leaping clear of abundance and lack; thus there are birth and death, delusion and realization, sentient beings and buddhas. Yet in attachment blossoms fall, and in aversion weeds spread.

To carry the self forward and illuminate myriad things is delusion. That myriad things come forth and illuminate the self is awakening.

Those who have great realization of delusion are buddhas; those who are greatly deluded about realization are sentient beings. Further, there are those who continue realizing beyond realization, who are in delusion throughout delusion. When buddhas are truly buddhas, they do not necessarily notice that they are buddhas. However, they are actualized buddhas, who go on actualizing Buddha.

When you see forms or hear sounds, fully engaging body and mind, you intuit dharma intimately. Unlike things and their reflections in the mirror, and unlike the moon and its reflection in the water, when one side is illumined, the other side is dark.

To study the Buddha Way is to study the self. To study the self is to forget the self. To forget the self is to be actualized by myriad things. When actualized by myriad things, your body and mind as well as the bodies and minds of others drop away. No trace of enlightenment remains, and this no-trace continues endlessly.

When you first seek dharma, you imagine you are far away from its environs. At the moment when dharma is correctly transmitted, you are immediately your original self. When you ride in a boat and watch the shore, you might assume that the shore is moving. But when you keep your eyes closely on the boat, you can see that the boat moves. Similarly, if you examine myriad things with a confused body and mind you might suppose that your mind and nature are permanent. When you practice intimately and return to where you are, it will be clear that nothing at all has unchanging self.

Firewood becomes ash, and it does not become firewood again. Yet do not suppose that the ash is after and the firewood before. You should understand that firewood abides in the phenomenal expression of firewood, which fully includes before and after and is independent of before and after. Ash abides in the phenomenal expression of ash, which fully includes before and after. Just as firewood does not become firewood agaiμ after it is ash, you do not return to birth after death.

This being so, it is an established way in Buddhadharma to deny that birth turns into death. Accordingly, birth is understood as no-birth. It is an unshakable teaching in the Buddha’s discourse that death does not turn into birth. Accordingly, death is understood as no-death.

Birth is an expression complete this moment. Death is an expression complete at this moment. They are like winter and spring. You do not call winter the beginning of spring, nor summer the end of spring.

Enlightenment is like the moon reflected on the water. The moon does not get wet, nor is the water broken. Although its light is wide and great, the moon is reflected even in a puddle an inch wide. The whole moon and the entire sky are reflected in dewdrops on the grass, or even in one drop of water.

"The depth of the drop is the height of the moon"
Enlightenment does not divide you, just as the moon does not break the water. You cannot hinder enlightenment, just as a drop of water does not hinder the moon in the sky. The depth of the drop is the height of the moon. Each reflection, however long or short its duration, manifests the vastness of the dewdrop, and realizes the limitlessness of the moonlight in the sky.

When dharma does not fill your whole body and mind, you may assume it is already sufficient. When dharma fills your body and mind, you understand that something is missing. For example, when you sail out in a boat to the middle of an ocean where no land is in sight, and view the four directions, the ocean looks circular, and does not look any other way. But the ocean is neither round nor square; its features are infinite in variety. It is like a palace. It is like a jewel. It only looks circular as far as you can see at that time. All things are like this.

Though there are many features in the dusty world and the world beyond conditions, you see and understand only what your eye of practice can reach. In order to learn the nature of the myriad things, you must know that although they may look round or square, the other features of oceans and mountains are infinite in variety; whole worlds are there. It is so not only around you, but also directly beneath your feet, or in a drop of water.

A fish swims in the ocean, and no matter how far it swims there is no end to the water. A bird flies in the sky, and no matter how far it flies there is no end to the air. However, the fish and the bird have never left their elements. When their activity is large their field is large. When their need is small their field is small. Thus, each of them totally covers its full range, and each of them totally experiences its realm. If the bird leaves the air it will die at once. If the fish leaves the water it will die at once.

Know that water is life and air is life. The bird is life and the fish is life. Life must be the bird and life must be the fish. You can go further. There is practice-enlightenment which encompasses limited and unlimited life.

Now if a bird or a fish tries to reach the end of its element before moving in it, this bird or this fish will not find its way or its place. When you find your place where you are, practice occurs, actualizing the fundamental point. When you find your way at this moment, practice occurs, actualizing the fundamental point; for the place, the way, is neither large nor small, neither yours nor others. The place, the way, has not carried over from the past, and it is not merely arising now. Accordingly, in the practice-enlightenment of the buddha way, to attain one thing is to penetrate one thing; to meet one practice is to sustain one practice.

Here is the place; here the way unfolds. The boundary of realization is not distinct, for realization comes forth simultaneously with the mastery of Buddha-dharma. Do not suppose that what you attain becomes your knowledge and is grasped by your intellect. Although actualized immediately, the inconceivable may not be apparent. Its appearance is beyond your knowledge.

Mayu, Zen Master Baoche, was fanning himself. A monk approached and said, “Master, the nature of wind is permanent and there is no place it does not reach. Why then do you fan yourself?”

“Although you understand that the nature of the wind is permanent,” Mayu replied, “you do not understand the meaning of its reaching everywhere.”

“What is the meaning of its reaching everywhere?” asked the monk again. Mayu just kept fanning himself. The monk bowed deeply.

The actualization of the Buddha-dharma, the vital path of its correct transmission, is like this. If you say that you do not need to fan yourself because the nature of wind is permanent and you can have wind without fanning, you will understand neither permanence nor the nature of wind. The nature of wind is permanent. Because of that, the wind of the Buddha’s house brings forth the gold of the earth and makes fragrant the cream of the long river.


Written in mid-autumn, the first year of the Tempuku Era [1233], and given to my lay student Koshu Yo of Kyushu Island. Revised in the fourth year of the Kencho Era [1252].
From Enlightenment Unfolds, ©1999 by San Francisco Zen Center, edited by Kazuaki Tanahashi. Reprinted with permission of Shambhala Publications, Inc., shambhala.com.
Genjokoan | Tricycle


thezensite: English Translations of Genjokoan

8 translations of Dogen's GenjoKoan by Aitken, Abe, Waddell, Jaffe, Nishijima, Cook, Cleary, Masunaga, and Stevens.


Genjokoan: The Question of Our Lives | White Wind Zen Community

first verse of Genjo Koan -
"When all things are seen as Awakened Experience then enlightenment and delusion, practices, life and death, Awakened Ones and sentient beings can be clearly discerned. When the vast expanse of experiences are met without self then there are no enlightenment, and no delusion, no practices, no life, no death, no Awakened Ones, no sentient beings. The Way of Awake Awareness transcends nothing or something. Thus, there are delusion and enlightenment, life and death, Awakened Ones and sentient beings. However, it is like this: despite our grasping flowers wither, despite our irritation weeds flourish."



links / see also

Dogen Zenji
Dogen Zenji, the founder of Soto Zen School as well as of Daihonzan Eiheiji, was born on January 2, 1200 CE. This was during the Kamakura Period of Japanese history, the year following the death of Minamoto Yoritomo. It is said that his father was Koga Michichika, a government minister, and that his mother was Ishi, the daughter of Fujiwara Motofusa. Presumably, young Dogen Zenji lived in comfort. However, at the age of thirteen, he climbed Mt. Hiei, and the next year he shaved his head and became a monk. It is said that he became a monk because he felt the impermanence of the world on his mother’s death when he was eight years old.

whats more: The Ino's Blog: Study Hall - Shobogenzo
"(lit. 'Treasury of the True Dharma Eye') The term Shōbōgenzō has three main usages in Buddhism: (1) It can refer to the essence of the Buddha's realization and teaching, that is, to the Buddha Dharma itself, as viewed from the perspective of Mahayana Buddhism, (2) it is the title of a koan collection with commentaries by Dahui Zonggao, and (3) it is used in the title of two works by Dogen Kigen..."

Shōbōgenzō (@Wikipedia)
Shobogenzo links (@"Hey Bro! Can You Spare Some Change?") (top of right column)

• whats more: more about Zen & Buddhism
• whats more: The Ino's Blog: Counting To Nine | Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind
• whats more: apocalyptic buddhism | Kalachakra | to become a buddha | beginner's mind | peace action

• whats more: buddha art
• whats more: diamond sutra art
• whats more: dharma wheel art


-!- buddhism zen dogen shobogenzo "genjo koan" -!-


Sunday, July 31, 2011

apocalyptic buddhism | Kalachakra | to become a buddha | beginner's mind | peace action



apocalyptic buddhism

this only thing
that there is
is NOW
as it is


An Apocalypse (Greek: ἀποκάλυψις apokálypsis; "lifting of the veil" or "revelation") is a disclosure of something hidden from the majority of mankind in an era dominated by falsehood and misconception, i.e. the veil to be lifted.


Zen and Buddhism
from "Extract(s) from JAPAN AS IT IS published by Gakken Co."

Political and social unrest and the rise of the warrior class in the mid-Heian period gave credence to an apocalyptic Buddhism that laid the foundation for a new Buddhism in the Kamakura period (1185–1333).

This new Buddhism emerged as the Nichiren, Joudo, joudo Shinshuu, and Zen sects--still the leading Buddhist sects--teaching a salvation through grace that was quite different from the intellectual Buddhist philosophy of the Nara-period nobility. These sects taught that simple repetition of 'Namu myou houren gekyou' (I place my faith in the Lotus Sutra) or 'Namu amidabutsu' (I place my faith in Amida Buddha), or meditation in the case of Zen, were sufficient to save one's soul.

With its much broader popular appeal, the new Buddhism spread rapidly, and this was reinforced in the Edo period (1603–1868) by the shogunate's danka system requiring all families to be registered with one of the country's many Buddhist temples. Instituted as an instrument for repressing Christianity, this system also helped the government keep tabs on the people.

Calligraphy: Yamashita_Gen-yu(1832-1934) - "Namu-amida-butsu" @Wikimedia Commons



Kalachakra - Wheel of Time


Kalachakra

कालचक्र

Kalachakra (Sanskrit: कालचक्र; IAST: Kālacakra) is a Sanskrit term used in Tantric Buddhism that literally means "time-wheel" or "time-cycles." The spelling Kalacakra is also correct.

Kalachakra refers both to a Tantric deity (Tib. yidam) of Vajrayana Buddhism and to the philosophies and meditation practices contained within the Kalachakra Tantra and its many commentaries. The Kalachakra Tantra is more properly called the Kalachakra Laghutantra, and is said to be an abridged form of an original text, the Kalachakra Mulatantra which is no longer extant. Some Buddhist masters assert that Kalachakra is the most advanced form of Vajrayana practice; it certainly is one of the most complex systems within tantric Buddhism.

The Kalachakra tradition revolves around the concept of time (kāla) and cycles (chakra): from the cycles of the planets, to the cycles of human breathing, it teaches the practice of working with the most subtle energies within one's body on the path to enlightenment.



The Kalachakra deity represents a Buddha and thus omniscience. Since Kalachakra is time and everything is under the influence of time, Kalachakra knows all. Whereas Kalachakri or Kalichakra, his spiritual consort and complement, is aware of everything that is timeless, untimebound or out of the realm of time. In Yab-yum, they are temporality and atemporality conjoined. Similarly, the wheel is without beginning or end.




Dalai Lama audio and video | The Office of His Holiness The Dalai Lama

"Kalachakra Preliminary Teachings"



Day one of His Holiness the Dalai Lama's three day teaching on Gyalsey Thokme Sangpo's "37 Practices of A Boddhisattva (laklen sodunma)" and Kamalashila's "Stages of Meditation - Middle Volume (gomrim barpa)" given on July 9-11, 2011, that were preliminary teachings to the Kalachakra Empowerment. (www.dalailama.com)



to become a buddha



Shobogenzo

In Japan and the West, the term Shōbōgenzō is most commonly known as referring to the titles of two works composed by Japanese Zen master Dōgen Kigen in the mid-13th century.


正法眼蔵
Shōbōgenzō

whats more: The Ino's Blog: Study Hall - Shobogenzo: (lit. "Treasury of the True Dharma Eye") The term Shōbōgenzō has three main usages in Buddhism: (1) It can refer to the essence of the Buddha's realization and teaching, that is, to the Buddha Dharma itself, as viewed from the perspective of Mahayana Buddhism, (2) it is the title of a koan collection with commentaries by Dahui Zonggao, and (3) it is used in the title of two works by Dogen Kigen... (more @Wikipedia)



道元禅師
Dōgen Zenji (also Dōgen Kigen 道元希玄, or Eihei Dōgen 永平道元, or Koso Joyo Daishi) (19 January 1200 – 22 September 1253) was a Japanese Zen Buddhist teacher born in Kyōto, and the founder of the Sōtō school of Zen in Japan after travelling to China and training under the Chinese Caodong lineage there. Dōgen is known for his extensive writing including the Treasury of the Eye of the True Dharma or Shōbōgenzō, a collection of ninety-five fascicles concerning Buddhist practice and enlightenment.



The Ino's Blog: Study Hall - Shobogenzo

Thursday, July 28, 2011
Study Hall - Shobogenzo
There is a simple way to become a buddha: When you refrain from unwholesome actions, are not attached to birth and death, and are compassionate toward all sentient beings, respectful to seniors and kind to juniors, not excluding or desiring anything, with no thoughts or worries, you will be called a buddha. Seek nothing else

- 'Birth and Death', 'Shoji'


The Ino's Blog: Study Hall - Shobogenzo

Monday, June 13, 2011
Study Hall - Shobogenzo
In this way, you let go of yourself for the sake of dharma without knowing how many thousands of times you do so. You seek dharma for the sake of yourself without knowing in how many billions of eons you do so. This is the vital activity of following a teacher. This is the activity of practicing yourself and following yourself...

To speak of dharma and practice for others is to hear dharma, to clarify dharma, and to realize dharma, birth after birth. If you have a sincere heart in speaking of dharma to others in this birth, your attaining dharma is easy. Or, if you assist and support others hearing dharma, your study of dharma receives a wholesome effect. You receive the effect in your body and in your mind...

This being so, if you hear a phrase from someone in a far-eastern region, speak it for another in a far-western region. Endeavor in hearing and speaking equally with a single self. Practice and realize an east self and a west self.

Rejoice, hope for, and have the aspiration for bringing buddha ancestors' dharma, the ancestral way, closer to your body and mind. Extend this practice from one hour to one day, then to one year and to one lifetime. Make buddha ancestors' dharma the essential spirit and play with it. This is to live your life meaningfully.


Uplift from 'Self-Realization Samadhi'
('Jisho Zammai')

• see also: whats more: The Ino's Blog: Study Hall - Shobogenzo

"...what you receive with trust is your one verse or your one phrase. Do not try to understand eighty thousand verses or phrases..."

'Face-to-Face Transmission', 'Menju', is a lot of fun; Dogen gets personal, both for himself, and with an ad hominem section in the postscript:
If you do not realize the fruit at this moment, when will you realize it?

If you do not cut off delusion at this moment, when will you cut off delusion?

If you do not become a buddha at this moment, when will you?

If you do not sit as a buddha at this moment, when will you practice as an active buddha?

Diligently examine this in detail...


~ Dōgen Zenji

> whats more: The Ino's Blog: Study Hall - Shobogenzo


Zen Beginner: Reading List

a nice collection with links (SFZC store and Kindle) from "Zen Beginner" - thanks!

"For me, getting involved in Zen practice has involved a lot of reading to help myself get up to speed reasonably quickly. Here's my suggested reading list, in recommended order (which is not necessarily the order I read them in)..."

Suzuki Roshi
Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind - The Classic. Required reading if you're planning to practice at Zen Center. Seriously, if you're reading this blog and haven't read this stop right now, got get a copy and come back when you're done.

Zen is Right Here: Teaching Stories and Anecdotes of Shunryu Suzuki - A collection of short, easily digestible, quotes and anecdotes of Suzuki Roshi. A good one to have handy for idle browsing or if you want a quick something to ponder.

Crooked Cucumber: The Life and Zen Teaching of Shunryu Suzuki - Not by Suzuki Rosh, but an account of his life and the early years of SFZC. Full of stories that really help to make sense of some of the particularities of life and practice at Zen Center. My favorite is about how the first rule at Tassajara is that brooms should be stored with their bristles up, and every time I've opened a broom closet (which turns out to be a lot) I've found them stored just so.

Not Always So: Practicing the true Spirit of Zen - Another collection of Suzuki Roshi's talks. It's only available in print right now so it might take me a while to get around to finishing.

Branching Streams Flow in the Darkness - Some of Suzuki Roshi's last lectures, discussing the Sandokai which is chanted on a regular basis in services, and particularly during memorials. I'm about half way through so that the first half of the chant is filled with meaning and the second half is still a bit of a mystery.

Reb Anderson
- the most senior teacher at Zen Center and lives at Green Gulch. His two books cover the precepts (which you'll want to read before asking to take the precepts and getting permission to start sewing a Rakusu) as well as a collection of Dharma Talks he's given over the years. - Being Upright: Zen Meditation and the Bodhisatva Precepts, and Warm Smiles from Cold Mountains: Dharma Talks on Zen Meditation

D.T. Suzuki
- a well regarded Buddhist scholar who wrote some of the first english texts on Zen. He's primarily concerned with Rinzai but these texts are what brought a lot of people to Zen Center in the 60s and 70s so they're helpful in understanding the early history of the lineage and some of the details of practice.

An Introduction to Zen Buddhism | Manual of Zen Buddhism
> Zen Beginner: Reading List with links

• see also: The Ino's Blog: Counting To Nine | Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind



you are already Buddha yourself
  ~ Shunryu Suzuki Roshi




stupahead: generosity

Hui-Hai, when asked how one might enter the gate of his school, says, “by means of giving,” literally dana paramita. when asked to clarify he says something startling that might be translated as, “giving means giving up,” or perhaps “giving over,” and adds that all the other practices that make up the Bodhisattva Path are realized through dana. this giving over is what it actually means to be free from suffering in this moment – “naked and free in the midst of the bustling marketplace”. without it even the most diligent practice is just spiritual athleticism and the most meticulous study is empty Zenology. it is what allows us to draw sustenance from the fabric and shape of everyday life and, even at the most difficult of times, find space to turn around.

in any encounter, even the most straightforward, the self-construct stakes out a position because that’s how its works. but, if we pay close attention, it’s easy to see that this act of staking out a position, drawing up categories and making up stories about them is exactly the thing that impoverishes our experience causing us to suffer and bring suffering to others. it’s the source of what the Buddha called “self clinging”. the most intimate request of practice, whether we’re sitting quietly in the Zendo or out wandering around in the World trying not to bump into things, is to relinquish our precious position and move into the very center of the encounter. to stand as close as possible, neither grasping or turning away. this is the essence of dana and, through it, practice is fulfilled.



Sign of the Times: Meditate to Happiness
ABC News | Health

interesting mainstream American TV -
commercial advertising caution

Meditation 101: Tips for Beginners
By EDWARD LOVETT
July 28, 2011

Little by little, meditation is shedding its image as a strange spiritual discipline practiced by monks and ascetics in Asia. Gwyneth Paltrow meditates. Rivers Cuomo, lead singer of the rock band Weezer, meditates. David Lynch -- his movies are strange, but he is strangely normal -- meditates. Meditation has helped recent military veterans deal with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Beyond celebrities and the military, there's science. A growing body of research shows that meditation has a discernible effect on the brain that promotes various types of health and well-being...



peace action



Buddhist Peace Fellowship


Socially engaged Buddhism is a dharma practice that flows from the understanding of the complete yet complicated interdependence of all life. It is the practice of the bodhisattva vow to save all beings. It is to know that the liberation of ourselves and the liberation of others are inseparable. It is to transform ourselves as we transform all our relationships and our larger society. It is work at times from the inside out and at times from the outside in, depending on the needs and conditions. It is is to see the world through the eye of the Dharma and to respond emphatically and actively with compassion.
- Donald Rothberg and Hozan Alan Senauke, Turning Wheel Magazine/Summer-Fall - 2008

Wholehearted Connection
Buddhist Peace Fellowship is a community of primarily dharma practitioners established to support socially engaged efforts of visionaries of compassionate social justice and dharma-based organizations for social change.

Mutual Liberation
Buddhist Peace Fellowship is a leader in socially engaged Buddhism, cultivating peace through sharing with others decades of experience, providing donors who value peacemaking to other organizations, and educating the public with dharma-centered views of social justice. We are here to assist in implementing projects that work toward ending suffering in the world.

A Voice for Change
Buddhist Peace Fellowship makes an effort to speak without anger and opposition for those who have been silenced by war, poverty, environmental disaster, genocide, and youth whose lives have been impacted by violence.


CYMD 2008 was organized by the Buddhist Peace Fellowship of Tampa Bay. Each year we bring together the various traditions of Buddhists from around Tampa Bay to share their insights, teachings, and practices with the general public.


Thich Nhat Hanh: What Is Engaged Buddhism?



see also: whats more: Ram Dass interviews Thicht Nhat Hanh (1995)
One of the best known and most respected Zen masters in the world today, poet, and peace and human rights activist, Thich Nhat Hanh has led an extraordinary life. Born in central Vietnam in 1926 he joined the monkshood at the age of sixteen. The Vietnam War confronted the monasteries with the question of whether to adhere to the contemplative life and remain meditating in the monasteries, or to help the villagers suffering under bombings and other devastation of the war. Nhat Hanh was one of those who chose to do both, helping to found the 'engaged Buddhism' movement. His life has since been dedicated to the work of inner transformation for the benefit of individuals and society.



A World Without Armies

"Advocating Practical Steps Towards a Lasting Peace"


From a series of workshops and a traveling exhibition featuring artwork from school children in Nepal, Poland, Germany, Italy, Costa Rica, the United States, and other countries.

What we must learn is how to deal with that conflict without resorting to violence. At this beginning of the twenty-first century, we are being called upon to face the needs of humanity, in all its tragic urgency. And we must, at the same time, face up to the requirements of the species: this century shall be peaceful or shall not be at all.
— Rodrigo Carazo, President of Costa Rica, 1978-1982


A World Without Armies - Imagine a world without war

"We will bring forth clear and positive messages on demilitarization based on rigorous studies, political experiences, and individual witness and testimony."

A Letter to Participants of the Global Alliance Conference

August 2009
Dear Colleagues of Peace,

Greetings from the U.S. chapter of A World Without Armies! We deeply appreciate your work for peace in the world and peace with the earth. Together with three other organizations, we co-sponsored the First Conference of Women for the Abolition of Armies in Central America by 2020, which was held at the Costa Rican Ministry of Culture and the Universidad de Cooperacion Internacional in San José in 2007. In order to achieve our common goal, our next step is to develop academic studies on the demilitarization potential of every nation. We need to understand the positive elements, challenges, and obstacles for reducing and abolishing military forces in each nation. We need to develop strategies and build concrete processes. It would be effective if people and organizations that are committed to do the work were all connected and collaborating domestically and internationally. We want to see a surge of a movement for demilitarization worldwide.

Your ideas, suggestions, and action reports on demilitarization would be valuable to all those who are concerned. We would like to learn from you, collaborate with you, and share our experience with you. Also, we would like to post some of the communications and photographs from you on our website, www.aworldwithoutarmies.org. Please write to us and we will write to you.


With best wishes,
Kazuaki Tanahashi, Director (see below)
Edie Hartshorne, Co-director
Catherine Margerin, Representative to the Global Alliance Conference


METHODS

• We organize and sponsor peace and reconciliation programs around the world.

• We fund scholars in political science, peace studies, and related fields who are undertaking research on the demilitarization potential of nations.

• We promote Courageous Conversations--friendly and non-polarized discussions that explore the need and steps for creating a world without war.

• We host the Costa Rica Initiative--a women’s initiative for A Central America Without Armies.

PROJECTS IN PROGRESS SINCE 2002






Gallery: Imagining Peace: International Children's Art Project

A series of workshops and a traveling exhibition featuring artwork from school children in Nepal, Poland, Germany, Italy, Costa Rica, the United States, and other countries.



Kazuaki Tanahashi


Kazuaki Tanahashi, Director of A World Without Armies, born and trained in Japan and active in the United States since 1977, has had solo exhibitions of his calligraphic paintings internationally. He has taught East Asian calligraphy at eight international conferences of calligraphy and lettering arts. Also a peace and environmental worker for decades, he is a Fellow of the World Academy of Art and Science.





The Zen Peacemakers

A Force for Socially Engaged Buddhism

Inspiring | Teaching | Doing

"When you realize the wholeness and interdependence of life, you have to take care of everyone, and to do that, you have to work with every ingredient of life." - Zen Master Bernie Glassman, Founder

The mission of the Zen Peacemakers is to alleviate suffering by:

• developing holistic social service projects that help individuals, families
and communities;
• promoting and supporting Socially Engaged Buddhism throughout the West; and
• inspiring and training a new generation in this way of service as Zen practice.


About Zen Peacemakers blog

Discussions on articles from Bearing Witness, the free monthly online newsletter of Western Socially Engaged Buddhism
Commentary on Socially Engaged Buddhism
Writings of Zen Peacemakers founder Bernie Glassman, including previously unreleased material
Up-to-date news from the Zen Peacemakers Mother House in Montague, MA including:
Montague Farm Zen House
Zen House Residence Program
Montague Farm Zendo and Shared Stewardship Circle
First major Symposium for Western Socially Engaged Buddhism




GlobaLove Think Tank: theft

"Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron."

Dwight D. Eisenhower



The Right Side: Balancing Pride

this is from my son's blog - The Right Side - check it out! he makes me proud :)

i love how he has learned to approach life, and share it -
"I pushed my bed against the wall so I never wake up on the wrong side"

You’ve heard it before and know it’s true: life is all about balance. It’s just like surfing. Sometimes the waves are knocking you down and sometimes you’re shredding them with grace and style. Every aspect of our lives needs to be in balance and it takes constant practice and awareness to reach a happy level of equilibrium.

There’s one particular aspect that this applies to twofold: Pride.

First, there’s the sense of outward pride you have with yourself and other people. And I think the golden rule in this sense is to “check your ego at the door”. Humility is a virtue and one that should be practiced by all. It doesn’t matter how much money you make or how popular you are, you’re just as much a human being as every other person on this planet so don’t ever act like you’re better than anyone else. Always stay modest and humble because no one likes the company of a cocky person.

Second, there’s your inner pride, your self-confidence. I think that it’s good be aware of the areas of your life that need improvement because that allows for you to set goals and take steps towards reaching your full potential. But too much attention on your shortfalls can be very unhealthy and cause damage to your self-esteem. We can’t always focus on what we’re not happy with. There needs to be balance. We must also recognize the greatness within ourselves and take pride in knowing that we are amazing people with lots of wonderful qualities.

I think the key to finding balance in this area of our lives is to stay outwardly humble and inwardly proud. Practice modesty and humility in your interactions with others but also make sure to take the time to appreciate and acknowledge yourself for your accomplishments and character. Check your ego at the door then give yourself a pat on the back.



see also

• Master of the Shakuhachi & about Zen & Buddhism

Dharma Wheel & About Dharma



• Buddha artwork
tag on facebook | buddha artwork by rc

• more buddhist art
Bhumisparsha Mudrā update | Life of Zen

Dharma Wheel & About Dharma

tara 8790 (more)

Vajrapani 100514

Diamond Sutra

buddha cave

free high resolution artwork downloads | donate


Saturday, July 16, 2011

Bhumisparsha Mudrā update | Life of Zen



Bhumisparsha Mudrā update


detail 1 -



4 x 6



" Mara demanded to know who would testify that Siddhartha was worthy of attaining ultimate wisdom. And his demon army rose up to support him. Siddhartha said nothing. He reached down and touched the ground, and the earth shuddered. "

previous / development: whats more: Bhumisparsha Mudrā | Young Urban Zen | Dalai Lama | Science meets Buddhism


detail 2 -



5 x 7




Life of Zen - sotozen.net


Life of Zen video

http://global.sotozen-net.or.jp/eng/photos_videos/life_of_Zen/eng/movie_player_eng.html

see also: what next: Zen - Movie about Dogen
Banmei Takahashi's "Zen" - based on the life of Japanese Zen Master Dogen (19 January 1200 – 22 September 1253).


Soto Zen Buddhism International Symposium


Soto Zen continues to spread around t he globe. Presently, there are more than 600 Soto Zen priests outside of Japan, and the teaching of Soto Zen continues to expand and develop beyond race and the confines of culture. It is in connection with these developments that we are planning to hold on October 4th, 2011, a Soto Zen Buddhism International Symposium called "Advance One Step Further - Soto Zen Opens The Way To The Future -". We plan to hold this symposium at the Tokyo Grand Hotel at Sotoshu Shumucho in Tokyo and will invite Sotoshu priests, practitioners, and temple members from around the world, as well as participants from Japan.

The keynote lecture will be given by Mr. Noriyuki Ueda, a scholar who is active in many spheres. He makes an appeal to "the Great Possibilities for Buddhism in Contemporary Society." During the symposium, a presentation will be made by each of the directors of the four Sotoshu regional offices (Hawaii, North America, South America and Europe) on the ways Soto Zen is growing overseas, a panel discussion on the future of Soto Zen as it takes root around the world, and a social gathering. As a way of introducing various Zen centers and temples within the four overseas districts to the audience, we plan to display information about them by way of television monitors. We also plan to exhibit and sell items that are made at these temples in their fundraising efforts.

I believe this will be a good opportunity for many people to get to know the situation of Soto Zen as it is developing outside of Japan. Please be sure to join us for this symposium.

Gassho,
Rev. Issho Fujita
Director, Soto Zen Buddhism International Center


see also: whats more: Workshop at the Zen Center with Issho Fujita


Shobogenzo Zuimonki

1.Zen Master Eihei Dogen and Koun Ejo

Shobogenzo Zuimonki consists of the dharma talks of Eihei Dogen Zenji (1200–1253) who transmitted Soto Zen from China to Japan. These talks were originally recorded by Koun Ejo Zenji, Dogen’s dharma successor, and probably edited by his disciples after Ejo’s death.

In this introduction, I’d like to briefly introduce Ejo Zenji since he is not as well known in the West as Dogen Zenji.

Ejo was born of a noble family, the Fujiwara, in Kyoto, in 1198. In 1215, at eighteen years of age, he was ordained as a Tendai monk under Master Enno at Yokawa on Mt. Hiei. He studied the fundamental philosophy of Buddhism; the Kusha (Abhidharmakosa-bhasya) Jojitsu (Satyasidhi-sastra), and Tendai teachings etc. However, he realized that studying for fame and profit or for high position in the Buddhist order was meaningless. Arousing bodhi-mind, he wanted to leave the monastery just as many other Buddhist leaders did in that age...



see also


• previous / development: whats more: Bhumisparsha Mudrā | Young Urban Zen | Dalai Lama | Science meets Buddhism

whats more: Workshop at the Zen Center with Issho Fujita

Master of the Shakuhachi & about Zen & Buddhism

what next: Zen - Movie about Dogen

• more buddhist art -


buddha 100407

Dharma Wheel & About Dharma

tara 8790 (more)

Vajrapani 100514

Diamond Sutra

buddha cave

free high resolution artwork downloads | donate